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Forestry Blog

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Illinois Loggers and Licensed Timber Buyers Search Tool

In 2015, there were 377 licensed timber buyers in Illinois. Are you working with an independent professional forester to market your timber to all of these loggers?


These buyers represent a wide range of locations, equipment, markets, expertise, and work quality. The first logger who knocks to offer a check for your timber is probably not able to offer you the best combination of profit and care for your woods. For example, in an IDNR survey of 285 sealed bid timber sales coordinated by an independent professional forester in central Illinois from 1987-2014, the high bid was an average of 61% greater than the low bid.

Find an Illinois Logger

Search timber buyers within miles of


All Illinois Timber Buyers




Illinois Loggers and Timber Buyers Search Tool developed by Jake Hendee. Data current as of December 2015.

Illinois Forestry Development Act - Property Tax Implications

Jake Hendee, Consulting Forester 


The Illinois Forestry Development Act relieves the property tax burden on woodland owners
Illinois Forestry Development Act Example. Let's say you've purchased 40 acres of woods for $100,000 to hunt trophy whitetails. Without doing anything, you would be taxed each year at 1/3 its value ($33,333) times the local tax rate (let's say 7.5%). Approximately $2,500. You decide that paying that much in taxes is silly, so you cut down all the trees and plant turnips in order to pay agricultural tax rates. The soil is Westville Silt Loam with a Productivity Index of 100 (pretty average). That means you're taxed at 40 acres times the assessed value per acre ($87.23) times the local tax rate (let's say 7.5%).  Now you're paying $262 per year on your "ag ground." Pretend your new ag ground doesn't produce turnips very well, so you replant the trees. But this time, your friend has tipped you off to the Illinois Forestry Development Act. You hire a consulting forester to write a forest management plan. Now, it's taxed at 1/6th its equalized assessed ag value:  40 acres times $87.23 per acre times 1/6 times the 7.5% local tax rate. Your property taxes are now $43.62 per year. Not bad. What will your forest management plan save you over 10 years?

Read more: Illinois Forestry Development Act - Property Tax Implications

Forestry by Boat - Lessons Learned in the Mississippi River Bottomlands

Jake Hendee, Consulting Forester


Mississippi River Bottomland Forestry

Each day, Corps of Engineers foresters

commute to the worksite by boat.

As part of a recent Illinois and Iowa Society of American Foresters field tour, I had the opportunity to see some unique forestry performed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers along the Mississippi River. With 50,000 acres to manage, they are able to demonstrate and test a number of practices that can be used to better manage the frequently flooded riparian areas of private woodlots as well.

 

After a short commute by boat, we found ourselves island hopping through the refuge from forest management project to forest management project. 

 

Read more: Forestry by Boat - Lessons Learned in the Mississippi River Bottomlands

Indiana Forest Improvement Handbook

 

Jake Hendee, Consulting Forester

 

Purdue University and the Indiana Department of Natural Resources have teamed up to put together the Indiana Forest Improvement Handbook for landowners

On most woodlands, the best action you can take immediately is timber stand improvement. Whether that is a commercial improvement harvest, a month-long timber stand improvement effort, or just a weekly hike with a bottle of herbicide and a hatchet, you can always improve the quality of your woods. If you're too busy, there are cost-share resources and willing consultants to get the job done.

 

Check out the Forest Improvement Handbook that Purdue University and the Indiana Department of Natural Resources have teamed up to put together.

Timber Stand Improvement: An Abbreviated Do-It-Yourself Guide

Jake Hendee, Consulting Forester 

Jake Hendee implementing TSI with PPE on, chainsaw in hand, and herbicide at his side

Why Timber Stand Improvement (TSI)?

Timber stand improvement encourages faster growth and better forest health, an improved mix of species, and optimal wildlife habitat. Timber stand improvement is an action that landowners can take to improve their woodlands immediately. Four common methods of timber stand improvement include crop tree release, low thinning, cull tree removal, and invasive species removal. 

 

A general rule of thumb for timber stand improvement is that removing or deadening a tree should only be done if it will benefit a better tree or allow for regeneration of a more desirable species.

 

Read more: Timber Stand Improvement: An Abbreviated Do-It-Yourself Guide